Pierre Dal Corso interviewed by Bruno for Fashionography

Pierre Dal Corso | Interview: Bruno

How and why did you get into fashion photography?
I studied Art History and Photography in France and then spent a few years assisting between Paris and New York.  After that I decided to build my portfolio.  I never did a picture while assisting all these years and it’s like suddenly I woke up and started shooting non-stop following those days.  I had waited long enough so I knew more or less where exactly I wanted to go with my career when I actually started shooting.  That was a year and a half ago.

Were you ever the epitome of what it is to be a “starving artist?”  If so, how was that?
I decided what I wanted to do in life so I won’t complain about the bad as opposed to the good and the sacrifices I’ve had to make.  You have to live with the “whole package” in order to enjoy what’s good about it.  At the moment I’m still assisting other photographers and investing all my money in my productions.  I’m doing this in order to get my name and pictures out there in magazines and continue building my portfolio.

How important is it for aspiring fashion photographers to go where the competition is?
Team work is the key.  You can’t just shoot by yourself in your basement and expect to make a living out of it.  You have to have the right people around you and working with you.  And of course you have to be where the clients are.

What are you not fond of in the fashion industry?
I won’t spit on the industry.  I have to deal with it.  On a more personal level, there are a few things I try not to promote.  I’m not crazy about these pictures of drunk kids wearing overly expensive shoes and so on.  I’d rather create something I like and dream of in hopes of others enjoying it as much as me.

In your humble opinion, how important is nudity in fashion photography?
Nudity has always been an important part in every kind of imagery and art in general.  Fashion photography is more or less using the same codes as in cave or Renaissance paintings.  Only the intentions behind it have changed a bit.  Fashion is an industry which needs advertising and sex sells.  Nudity is mostly used in a very mercantile way, not very subtile and often degrading.  On my own, I prefer trying to restore a certain dignity and strength to my nude models by making them proud, willing and assuming.  But in the end I’m aware that only the viewer can decide what he or she wants to see.

Lively color and experimental light are major factors throughout your work.  Why is this important?
I love photos in black & white as much as I love them in color.  And black monochromes too.  I guess I can use all the tools I’m given to work with.  It’s just a matter of using what you’ve got in order to realize what you have in mind.  It’s usually pretty clear in my mind how my projects will look upon completion.  To achieve that I use everything I can.  Light is a big factor.  But make up and styling are huge.  And then there’s post production.  I try no to limit myself.  Every input of the process has it’s own importance and I make the most out of every stage of the process.  I don’t rely on Photoshop to make my pictures.

www.pierredalcorso.com

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